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5 Fun Ways to Say “Boring”

5 Fun Ways to Say “Boring”

1. Ennui
[ahn-wee]

Not all boredom is created equal: some of it is fleeting and circumstantial, and some of it teeters on existential crisis. Ennui tends toward the latter–or at least it used to. Derived from the French verb enuier meaning “to annoy,” its peak usage was in Victorian and Romantic literature to express a profound sense of weariness, even a spiritual emptiness or alienation from one’s surroundings and time. Nowadays it’s used at both ends of the boredom spectrum, but its deep literary history lends even the most shallow disinterest a grandiose air.

2. Bromidic
[broh-mid-ik]

Bromide is a chemical compound that was commonly used in sedatives in the 1800 and 1900s. It took on a figurative sense to mean a trite saying or verbal sedative, or a person who is platitudinous and boring, in the early 1900s with help of the U.S. humorist Frank Gelett Burgess, who published a book titled Are You a Bromide? in 1907. The next time a particularly bland work meeting lulls you into a near coma, remember to mentally log it as bromidic just before nodding off.

3. Prosaic
[proh-zey-ik]

If your personal brand of boredom stems from a deficit of literal or figurative poetry in your life, this is the word for you. Now commonly used to mean dull, matter-of-fact, or unimaginative, prosaic entered the lexicon as the adjectival form of the word prose–as innot poetry. Its evolution to mean uninspired and commonplace in a broader context feels in many ways like a love letter to the oft-neglected literary genre.

4. Insipid
[in-sip-id]

Much like bland and flavorlessinsipid is commonly used to describe food that leaves your taste buds wanting more, but it’s also used in an abstract sense to describe a person, place or thing that lacks distinction, depth or intrigue. Its versatility can be attributed to its root word, the Latin sapidus, which translates to well-tasted, wise, or prudent. The next time you find yourself surrounded by droning company and uninspired cuisine (perhaps on your next flight?) liven things up with this handy twofer.

5. Platitudinous
[plat-i-tood-n-uhs, -tyood-]

Stemming from the French word for flat, plat(think plateau), platitudinous is used most frequently to refer to lackluster or trite use of language. A political speech brimming with tiresome rhetoric and cliches can be said to be platitudinous, but with this illuminating descriptor in your word arsenal, your bemoaning of the speech doesn’t have to be.

(I found this on dictionary.com)

Can anyone think of any more? If so, comment!

Alot vs. A lot: 9 Language Crimes to Watch Out For

Alot vs. A lot: 9 Language Crimes to Watch Out For

1. Irregardless

Irregardless is considered nonstandard because of the two negative elements, ir- and-lessIrregardless first appeared in the early 20th century and was perhaps popularized by its use in a comic radio program from the 1930s. Use regardless to keep your grammar-loving friends at bay.

2. Thusly

Because both thus and thusly are adverbs, language aficionados find thusly unnecessary. The Chicago Manual of Style discourages the use of thusly altogether. For copy editors, spotting the word thusly has a cringe-inducing effect similar to hearing fingernails on a chalkboard.

3. Everyday

Be careful when using everyday. As one word it’s adjectival; spelled out as two words, every day is adverbial. If you remember to do your everyday chores every day, your grammar-savvy roommates will appreciate you.

4. Anyways

While it’s commonly used in speech and writing, anyways is nonstandard. Always drop the “s” and opt for the standard anyway to impress the language fanatics in your social networks. In a world of 140-letter tweets, that one saved character is valuable real estate.

5. Literally

The Internet is literally full of critics of the figurative use of literally. While employing this metaphorical usage might make many casual language lovers’ ears bleed, descriptivist lexicographers will hail you as a language innovator. Our advice: be self-aware. Know that if you use literally figuratively, it will sound horrible to some, and perfectly acceptable to others.

6. Alot

Alot is a frequent misspelling of a lot. As many middle school English teachers constantly remind their students, “A lot is a lot of words.” So make your old English teacher proud.

7. Alright

As an informal variant of all rightalright is perfectly acceptable. The popular song and album “The Kids Are Alright” by The Who is evidence of general acceptance of alright. However, note that the creators of the 2010 film The Kids are All Right couldn’t bring themselves to use the informal variant even if the title was a clear nod to The Who.

8. Fewer

Confusion of the terms fewer and less will set off alarms in the heads of language enthusiasts. Fewer is only to be used when discussing countable things, while less is generally used for singular mass nouns. For example, you can have less salt, money, honesty, or love, but fewer ingredients, dollars, people, or puppies.

9. Hopefully

Self-described language buffs might explode with untamed rage if they hear hopefully used as a sentence modifier as in “Hopefully, it won’t rain tomorrow.” However, since the 1930s, this sense has been folded into acceptable usage. That said, it’s important to understand the extreme reaction you might provoke if you use this common sentence starter. If someone gives you guff, just refer them to Dictionary.com’s excellent usage note at hopefully. Crisis averted.

(I found this on dictionary.com.)

Rules of the Blog

Rules of the Blog

The English language is an interesting thing.
Sometimes, new words are added on a whim.
Definitions change; some words are just for show;
But that is what happens as a society grows.

But, here, I wish to explain,
What is bringing us all great pain.
Today, grammar is a scarce thing;
Because of this “texting” thing.

Abbreviations make us forget,
What teachers are trying to make our minds get.
And “like” is not a synonym for “said,”
Using it in that manner makes intelligence seem dead.

On this blog there will be poetry, stories, and reviews,
I hope they will teach you a thing or two.
But this is a place of learning and growth;
So I want you to take an oath.

I swear I will comment and critique with fairness;
I swear I will comment if I have questions.
I swear I will treat people with dignity and respect,
For, if I do not, the comment will be a reject.

Those are the rules, so simple and so few,
Hopefully, they will be enough for you.
Education is important as you shall see,
For strong and empowered you shall be.

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