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Left Brain; Right Brain; Subconscious: Who Is In Charge?

Left Brain; Right Brain; Subconscious: Who Is In Charge?

Left Brain; Right Brain; SubconsciousLeft Brain; Right Brain; Subconscious

I am definitely right brained. Mostly. If you’re curious to find out what you are, click here.

I’m pretty sure most everyone knows about the left brain and the right brain; the left brain is logic and the right brain is creativity. But what a lot of people don’t take into consideration is their subconscious brain.

The subconscious brain is the most powerful. That part of your brain doesn’t just control your impulses and whether or not you act upon them. Robert Kiyosaki, in his book Increase Your Financial IQ, described it like this:

It does not think, but rather reacts, fights, flees, or freezes… The subconscious mind also affects our bodily actions via bodily-kinesthetic intelligence. For example, in the game of golf, pressure may cause a golfer to choke and miss an easy putt. Subconsciously, a person may freeze and not take action out of fear of making a mistake, or stay at a job for security rather than the love of the work.

The way I look at the subconscious mind is that, whether or not you want something doesn’t matter if your SUBCONSCIOUS doesn’t think it will ever happen.

THAT is why it is very important that you always think POSITIVE! Tell yourself that you CAN do something! If you go to do something and suddenly you feel like you can’t THAT is your subconscious working against you.

Shut it up.

Put up or shut up.

If you want it, fight and eventually your subconscious mind will come around.

Comment. How do you feel about this?

Cone of Learning

Cone of Learning

Cone of Learning

I took one look at this and everything made sense.

I first saw this picture, ever, in the book Increase Your Financial IQ by Robert T. Kiyosaki on page 183. I HIGHLY recommend this book.

People learn differently, everybody knows that, but not everyone knows why some people have difficulty. I have always been good at art because it was something we learned as we worked. Also, the teacher didn’t just talk; they talked and demonstrated.

I never really did well in a class that had us talk and take notes. Participation was key, depending upon the class and whether or not I cared about what I was learning.

But lectures bored me and I only remembered what I read if I was interested (which is how most people are, I would think). To the people who can remember whatever, kudos.

But, a word of advice, I found, adding a picture to the words tended to help. Here’s the math I have in my head: we remember 30% of the pictures we see and 10% of what we read. If you have a picture next to the words, that’s a 40% chance you’ll remember what it is that you are looking at.

I mean, it makes sense.

They have a combination on the list: we remember 50% of what we hear and see, which is why many people are able to remember the words in movies and why I did so well in art classes. Why I still do well in art classes.

I was, am, good at English because I love to read and the more interesting it is, the more likely I am to remember.

What do you all think? Comment!

Grammatically Speaking


Click image to open interactive version (via Staples.ca).

A New Addition to the Reading List

A New Addition to the Reading List

After looking through some of my books, I found one that I believe to be quite valuable: A Pocket Style Manual by Diana Hacker. And it will be going into the Improving Your Own Writing section of the reading list.

For those of you who do not know this book, it teaches clarity, grammar, punctuation and mechanics, research, MLA, APA, Chicago, and usage/grammatical terms. It’s good for those who have difficulty writing essays.

The Phrontistery

This link (above) I found a WHILE ago.

Here, you will find a list of extremely unusual words and their definitions.

Comment and tell me what you think of them!

Be Very Afraid: 8 Monsters of Literature and Folklore

Be Very Afraid: 8 Monsters of Literature and Folklore

1. Frankenstein

Just years after Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel Frankenstein first appeared on shelves, the title took on a life of its own. Though many people incorrectly believe that Frankenstein refers to the stitched-together monster endowed with life, the name, in fact, belongs to the monster’s creator, Dr. Frankenstein. However, this error is so ubiquitous that the term is now widely used to refer to the monster as well as the man.

2. Golem

Victorian English literature has Frankenstein, and Jewish folklore has the golem. Formed from clay, this humanoid midrashic monster comes to life with the aid of supernatural powers. In some stories, the golem becomes animate when the Hebrew word for “truth” is written on the forehead the monster. When the first letter in this word is smudged out, the Hebrew word “death” remains, and the golem dissolves into a mound of clay.

3. Grendel

The epic poem Beowulf features one of the most terrifying creatures in the Anglo-Saxon literary canon, Grendel. Written in Old English, Beowulf chronicles the story of the title character, a brave warrior, as he protects the King Hrothgar from an attack by Grendel. Once Beowulf defeats Grendel, however, the fun is not over; he must then defeat Grendel’s equally frightening revenge-seeking mother.

4. Dracula

While many folks know Dracula as a tuxedoed vampire sired by Bram Stoker in 1897, few are aware of Stoker’s real-life inspiration for this undead creature of the night. Vlad III Dracula notoriously skewered his enemies on stakes and then left them to die. These brutal tactics earned him the nickname Vlad the Impaler. The name Dracula means “son of Dracul,” and was a name handed down from Vlad III’s father.

5. Big Foot

Big Foot, sometimes called Sasquatch, is a large, hairy apish creature who wanders through the wilderness of the Pacific Northwest and Canada. This elusive giant is often hunted, but never caught. He gets his name from what his pursuers have gleaned about his form from the giant footprints he leaves behind. Perhaps one day these imprints will lead us to the genuine article.

6. Yeti

The yeti or the Abominable Snowman is Big Foot’s Asian counterpart. Allegedly found in the Himalayan Mountains, this white-furred beast treks through the high altitudes, unseen by human eyes. His name comes from the Tibetan word yeh-teh meaning “little manlike animal.”

7. Bogeyman

Possibly from the Middle English buggemeaning “a frightening specter,” bogeyman has been part of a cautionary tale told to naughty children since Victorian times. The bogeyman is said to kidnap children who have been bad, so always be good. We wouldn’t want the bogeyman to steal you away, now, would we?

8. Loch Ness monster

Diminutively called Nessie, the Loch Ness monster swims through the waters of Loch Ness, a lake in Scotland. The term Ness likely comes from the Old Celtic word meaning “roaring one.” Though there are many stories of the Loch Ness monster, her existence has never been confirmed by science. She exists merely as a legend. Perhaps it’s better this way.

(I found this on dictionary.com)

Can anyone think of any other monsters?

Double your fun with these irregular plurals!

Double your fun with these irregular plurals!

1. Spaghetti

Next time you dive into a hot plate of spaghetti, take a moment to appreciate each individual spaghetto. The word spaghetti is from the Italian spago meaning “thin rope, twine.” It’s amazing to think that this beloved, stringy pasta has been a plural all along. Early on in its time in English, spaghetti was spelled “sparghetti,” as in Eliza Acton’s pivotal 1845 cookbook Modern Cookery, but by 1885 the plural pasta assumed its currently accepted form.

2. Passersby

When a person is seen passing by a scene either casually or by chance, they are considered a passerby, but on a busy street, one passerby is just a member of a crowd of passersby. Instead of pluralizing the act of passing, as would the incorrect “passerbys,” this clever word pluralized the passer or passers themselves, indicating that multiple people might be getting a quick glimpse of the same thing.

3. Kine

If you think the plural of “cow” is “cows,” that’s right. However, kine is also an accepted alternate plural form, and it’s the only word in English whose plural shares no letters with the singular form! From the Old English cy, plural of cu (Old English for “cow”), kine is actually a double double, because it adds the secondary plural element “n” to the previously doubled “y” or “i” sound.

4. News

News comes from the Middle French nouvelles, or from the Latin nova meaning “new things.” News was originally spelled newis or newes, the plural form of the Middle English newe. The now-standard spelling news was not firmly established until the mid-17th century. When news first entered English in the 1300s, it referred literally to “new things,” though this sense is now obsolete. During the 15th century news took on the sense of “tidings” or “an account of recent events.” The construction “the news” only entered English in the 20th century.

5. Scissors

This handy cutting instrument consists of two blades pivoted together, but by no means is one blade a singular scissor. From the Medieval Latin cisoriascissors emerged in English as a plural without a singular, describing the cutting tool as a whole entity. The 19th century saw a short-lived slang use of scissors with the exclamation oh scissors!, which was used to express impatience or disgust.

6. Dice

As a noun, dice is the irregular plural form ofdie, a small cube typically marked on each side with one to six spots and used in pairs for games of chance. From the Middle English dees, an interchangeable singular and plural form, dice was reborn as a verb with to dice meaning to chop something into small die-sized cubes. Some evidence suggests that if you trace the etymology of dice all the way back to the Latin dare meaning “to give,” or in this case “to cast,” it shares root with our next term.

7. Data

When we download or research large amounts of data, it’s far too easy to gloss over each unique datum. A participle of the Latin verb dare, “datum” is on direct loan from the Latin, meaning “a thing that is given.” Today the word represents individual facts, statistics, or items of information, but the plural form data has come to function as a singular mass noun meaning “information” in the general sense.

(I found this on dictionary.com.)

Alot vs. A lot: 9 Language Crimes to Watch Out For

Alot vs. A lot: 9 Language Crimes to Watch Out For

1. Irregardless

Irregardless is considered nonstandard because of the two negative elements, ir- and-lessIrregardless first appeared in the early 20th century and was perhaps popularized by its use in a comic radio program from the 1930s. Use regardless to keep your grammar-loving friends at bay.

2. Thusly

Because both thus and thusly are adverbs, language aficionados find thusly unnecessary. The Chicago Manual of Style discourages the use of thusly altogether. For copy editors, spotting the word thusly has a cringe-inducing effect similar to hearing fingernails on a chalkboard.

3. Everyday

Be careful when using everyday. As one word it’s adjectival; spelled out as two words, every day is adverbial. If you remember to do your everyday chores every day, your grammar-savvy roommates will appreciate you.

4. Anyways

While it’s commonly used in speech and writing, anyways is nonstandard. Always drop the “s” and opt for the standard anyway to impress the language fanatics in your social networks. In a world of 140-letter tweets, that one saved character is valuable real estate.

5. Literally

The Internet is literally full of critics of the figurative use of literally. While employing this metaphorical usage might make many casual language lovers’ ears bleed, descriptivist lexicographers will hail you as a language innovator. Our advice: be self-aware. Know that if you use literally figuratively, it will sound horrible to some, and perfectly acceptable to others.

6. Alot

Alot is a frequent misspelling of a lot. As many middle school English teachers constantly remind their students, “A lot is a lot of words.” So make your old English teacher proud.

7. Alright

As an informal variant of all rightalright is perfectly acceptable. The popular song and album “The Kids Are Alright” by The Who is evidence of general acceptance of alright. However, note that the creators of the 2010 film The Kids are All Right couldn’t bring themselves to use the informal variant even if the title was a clear nod to The Who.

8. Fewer

Confusion of the terms fewer and less will set off alarms in the heads of language enthusiasts. Fewer is only to be used when discussing countable things, while less is generally used for singular mass nouns. For example, you can have less salt, money, honesty, or love, but fewer ingredients, dollars, people, or puppies.

9. Hopefully

Self-described language buffs might explode with untamed rage if they hear hopefully used as a sentence modifier as in “Hopefully, it won’t rain tomorrow.” However, since the 1930s, this sense has been folded into acceptable usage. That said, it’s important to understand the extreme reaction you might provoke if you use this common sentence starter. If someone gives you guff, just refer them to Dictionary.com’s excellent usage note at hopefully. Crisis averted.

(I found this on dictionary.com.)

Every Child Ready to Read

Every Child Ready to Read

Every Child Ready to Read Every Child Ready to Read Every Child Ready to Read Every Child Ready to Read

I Don’t Want You To Think Like Me. I Just Want You To Think!

I Don’t Want You To Think Like Me. I Just Want You To Think!

I Just Want You To Think

In my opinion, cults come to be because the leader is very good at telling their “followers” what to think to the point where they believe they feel the same way. I’m making that sound bad, but it doesn’t have to be if you think about it.

I wish the entire world was part of a cult under a leader that had everyone thinking they had to be kind, considerate, compassionate and against stabbing others in the back; would build a strong people that built other up instead of making a bunch of crabs in a buck that pull the strong ones down.

But I don’t see that happening in the near future. At least, not while I’m alive; unless I can make that happen and leave my mark on the world.

Hmm…

But I digress.

The point of this post is to alert people to the fact that our entire lives we are being told what to think and how to think; by our parents, teachers, friends, enemies, the media. Subliminal messages and double standards are everywhere and they run our lives. We are being fed fear and doubt instead of hope and confidence. We are fed one idea and we aren’t taught, at least some of us aren’t taught, to tolerate other perspectives.

I feel that needs to end.

For those who haven’t seen them yet, I have been posting things that have videos by the Nostalgic Critic. In those posts, I would give you my thoughts first and then you would hear his. I did that on purpose.

I encourage you to listen to the people around you and learn to value peoples’ perspectives. Get out of your bubble, you box, your comfort zone and learn to put yourself in other peoples’ shoes. Think.

I’m not saying think like me. I’m saying think.

There is more than one perspective. There is more than one think you can learn to be in this world. We live in an age of information, specializing when you can take advantage of that is hurting you.

I am learning to be a writer, poet, storyteller, artist, and internet marketer. I don’t have anything that defines me except for what I am, which is human, a woman, and a college graduate. But just because I graduated from school does not mean my education ends there.

I go to the library almost every day. I have at least 30 books check out right now that include topics like Tumblr/Wordpress for Dummies, to financial literacy, to new writing techniques.

My perspective on life keeps changing the more I read.

And it is still MY perspective.

Read.

Learn.

Think.

What book will you be reading today?

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