“Every Good Lie Has At Least 80% of the Truth In It”

“Every Good Lie Has At Least 80% of the Truth In It”

Why do you think politicians are so good at it? Lying. Why they are believed despite the fact most people know they are lying. Because there is a believable truth in that lie.

My father has been telling me about that 80% for as long as I can remember. But he also told me that lying destroyed trust.

All you have is your word. You break that, you’ve got nothing.

He was trying to prepare me for the real world by telling me about truth and lies.

I, in a sense, chose both.

Speak the truth, but study the lie. I like to know when someone is lying to me so that I know who to trust. It hasn’t always worked, but I’ve learned a lot along the way.

But, what some might not realize, there is entertainment in the 80%. A lie is a lie, sure, but then I think about the graphic novel AND the movie V for Vendetta. While as separate entities, they are forces that can stand alone, but looking at them as a whole is also valuable. They talk about truth, lies and, the most interesting topic, using a lie to tell the truth. They talk about revenge and payback, too, but the truth and lies is more important for this article.

My favorite quote from the movie, said by Evey Hammond, is:

My father was a writer. You would’ve liked him. He used to say that artists use lies to tell the truth, while politicians use them to cover the truth up.

To those of you who have seen this movie, “A man after my own heart,” indeed. If you have not seen the movie OR read the graphic novel, you should. I do not think you will understand the rest of the article any less, but they are good references to have in the background as you read.

An 80% I would like to bring to your attention can be found in the form of a video game called Dragon Age: Origins. It has many parallels into reality, despite the game being a fantasy, that I would like to address. Looking at how a game, or any piece of artwork, is created gives you insight into the people who created it, whether they realize this or not.

I don’t know how many people actually pay attention to the history(ies) created for the games, but the history in Dragon Age: Origins is a projection of reality: 80% the truth.

To start, Dragon Age has the Chant of Light (20%), the equivalent of the Bible (80%). The game itself begins with a canticle, meaning the game begins with:

1. one of the non-metrical hymns or chants, chiefly from the Bible (Chant of Light), used in church (chantry) services.
2. a song, poem, or hymn especially of praise.

It then goes on to explain more about the teachings of the chantry (church). To see the game’s opening scene, watch the video below.

To sum it up, it is the fault of the mages, who tried to usurp heaven, that darkspawn are in the world spreading their sin and their taint everywhere they go. A manifestation of the sins of man; hell on earth, which the dwarves have to deal with every day, allowing man to forget.

Until it blows up in their faces.

Kick ass metaphor.

And all of this is explained before you create your character for the game; either that of a human, an elf, or a dwarf.

But our sins was not the only thing I wanted to touch upon; there is more history in this game.

The game takes place in the country of Ferelden, but it wasn’t always called that. In fact, it didn’t really have a name before, except for place on the land called Arlathan, but the elves lived there in peace and tranquility all the same.

They had their own culture, language, and were immortal, but that all changed when the humans, Tevinter mages, came. And enslaved them for a millenia. They rose up and fought back, got their own land, again, but then it was taken by the humans… again. Before the fall of their second homeland, the Dales, a poet wrote:

Like dragons they fly, glory upon wings. Like dragons they savage, fearsome pretty things.

But doesn’t the story sound familiar?

Let’s expand it: the elves are living peacefully until they are enslaved by humans, but the Tevinter Mages raise Arlathan to the ground. During their enslavement, they lose their culture. They eventually rise up, with the help of the Prophetess Andraste (Jesus Christ) and gain their freedom. They get their own home again, the Dales, but when they refuse to build a chantry (church) to worship Andraste and the maker (g0d) the chantry sends forth the Exalted Marches and destroy the Dales. Now, the elves are either homeless. living in the forests trying to revive their lost culture by living away from the humans or they live in the slums of human cities being treated like second class citizens.

Doesn’t that sound like what happened the the “indians” before the United States came to be?

The “indians” were living peacefully, just like the elves, before they were enslaved. They rose up, only difference being the “indians” didn’t win their battles, but, like the elves, they are living in slums. I’m pretty sure I’m missing some details, but the basic information is there.

80%. The history of the United States is being portrayed by a fantasy: 20%.

That’s why I LOVE this game!

There are SO many parallels, not only between the game’s history and reality, but also between the characters of Dragon Age: Origins, Dragon Age: Origins- Awakening, and Dragon Age 2. If there are any parallels in Dragon Age Inquisition, we shall find out soon enough. (I CAN’T WAIT… but I don’t have a choice in the matter… :'()

These are some of the character parallels: Alistair=Aveline Vallen; Leliana=Sebastian Vael; Shale=Fenris and more.

I can’t WAIT to discuss them all!

What do you think about all of this? Comment your answer.

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About Monria Titans

"Knowledge is power," something that is said all the time. I am trying to LIVE by that and improve myself and I would wish for the world to do the same.

Posted on November 26, 2013, in Education, Get To Know Erica! Posts, History Posts, Videos and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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